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KELIKI PAINTING CLASS Learn Balinese Traditional Keliki Painting from local artists in a unique Culture setting. Practice the unique technique of Keliki painting with traditional materials and techniques. A local master artist will walk you through the process step by step working with you to create your own masterpiece to take home. This workshop is suitable for all ages and abilities. Together with the teacher you will gain an understanding of both the process as well as the traditional motif which give these work such depth and meaning. Learning about egg-painting in a traditional Balinese art style. This class conducted by locals will teach the basics of various Balinese egg-painting styles, such as the best ways to paint on an egg. You'll get to experience trying out a few styles including landscapes, floral and colour themes with close help from the teachers. Traditional Balinese egg painting class in the arts and cultural village of Ubud, Learn the basics behind traditional and ancient Balinese painting styles on the unique slate of an egg and Have a go at it yourself painting your own egg! This is a great way to spend a day, whether you're an artist, or a beginner. enjoy learning how batik is made in this relaxed studio in Ubud, This is an experience everyone should try. Our team are passionate about our craft and eager to share our knowledge and talent. It is truly bring out the artist in you. Not only is it a truly memorable and inspiring experience - it's convenient too.You'll learn the traditional art form using organic dyes and hot wax. We supply Includes all the materials you need to make your own original batik. The class is held in a casual but comfortable studio in the family home compound and is run by master artist. You can do everything stage of the process yourself under our guidance. T-Shirt Painting WOOD AND STONE CARVING

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Goa Gajah 'Elephant Cave'

Goa Gajah ‘Elephant Cave’ is an archaeological site of significant historical value that makes it a special place to visit. Located on the cool western edge of Bedulu Village, six kilometres out of central Ubud, you do not need more than an hour to descend to its relic-filled courtyard and view the rock-wall carvings, a central meditational cave, bathing pools and fountains.

Goa Gajah dates back to the 11th century, built as a spiritual place for meditation. The main grounds are down a flight of steps from the roadside and parking area, which is lined with various art and souvenir shops and refreshment kiosks. Upon reaching the base you will come across a large ‘wantilan’ meeting hall and an assortment of large old stone carvings, some restored to their former full glory. The pool, excavated in 1954, features five out of supposedly seven statues depicting Hindu angels holding vases that act as waterspouts.

Various structures reveal Hindu influences back to the 10th century, and some relics feature elements of Buddhism dating even earlier to the 8th century. The cave is shallow; inside are three stone idols each wrapped in red, yellow and black cloths. Black soot lines the cave’s walls as result from the current-day incense burning. Several indentations show where meditating priests once sat. The northern side of the complex is dominantly Buddhist while south across the river it’s mostly Shivaite.

At the southern end are beautiful rice fields and small streams that lead to the Petanu River – another natural site entwined in local legends. Goa Gajah was built on a hillside and as two small streams met here forming a campuhan or ‘river junction’, the site was considered sacred and was built for hermetic meditation and prayers.

Even though the site’s name translates into ‘Elephant Cave’, you won’t find any pachyderms here. Various theories suggest the origin of the name, such as back in time the Petanu River was originally called ‘Lwa Gajah’, meaning the ‘River Gajah’, before it came to be called Petanu River. Other sources state that the ‘Gajah’ or elephant aspect came from the stone figure inside the cave depicting the Hindu lord Ganesh, who is characterised by an elephant’s head.

Ancient inscriptions also allude to the name Antakunjarapada, which roughly translates to ‘elephant’s border’. The cave’s entrance shows a menacing giant face with its wide open mouth as the door. Various motifs depicting the forest and animals are carved out of the outer rock face. The giant face was considered to be that of an elephant’s.

The complex is open daily 08:00 - 16.00. As with any temple in Bali, women during their periods are forbidden entrance and wearing a sarong and waist sash is a must. These are available for rent at the entrance. Goa Gajah temple celebrates its 'piodalan' temple anniversary on an 'Anggara Kasih Prangbakat' Tuesday on the Balinese 210-day Pawukon calendar, which coincides with June 25, 2013. Entry tickets are 15,000 rupiah for adults and 7,500 for children.

Goa Gajah
Opening Hours: Mon – Sun, 08:00 - 16.00
Location: Bedulu Village, Jalan Raya Goa Gajah, Blahbatuh, Gianyar
How to get there: Go east from Ubud approximately 3km towards Jalan Raya Goa Gajah

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